Posts Tagged ‘general’

Dog Sitters: How Many Dogs Should You Have at One Time?

Thursday, April 11th, 2013

dog walkers city mega

The dog sitting and walking business is currently booming particularly in metropolitan areas where owners spend long days at work or travel frequently. The process of hiring one of these professionals should be one that is well thought out and if possible, hired by word of mouth as there is a lot of valuable and reliable information a pet owner can get from referrals.

Although dog sitters made a decent living, committing to only one or two dogs is likely not going to pay the bills and this is why most have numerous clients at one time. It is common for sitters to also have to take care of several pooches all at once so that they can manage theirs and their client’s expectations as well as earn more money.

So how many dogs at one time are too much for the sitter? And as the pet owner, how many other dogs should you allow that sitter to supervise at the same time as yours? Here are some basic guidelines for both pet owners and sitters to follow so that the job remains through and manageable.

Laws of Dog Sitting

Though some regions such as the UK do have strict laws about how many dogs can be sat for or walked at one time, most US regions do not. The unwritten rule in the dog sitting community is that anyone, owner or sitter, can walk or sit for as many dogs as they can safely handle at one time.

Having said that, there will be differing definitions of ‘properly handling’ and the number of dogs in one’s care. It is a dog sitter’s responsibility to ensure that they are giving proper care and attention to each of their client’s pooches and just as with kids, at a certain point if that number is too great, something will be missed and the quality of care will naturally decrease.

Lots of things should be taken into consideration when deciding on how many dogs one should sit for at one time.

The Breed Matters

Just like people, dogs have their own quirks and personalities and not all of the different breeds will mesh well or get along. Some dogs are naturally more aggressive such as American Pit Bull Terriers and when put in the same areas as other breeds, it could be like mixing oil with water. Chances are if you are house sitting for several dogs at one time, the owners have already acclimated the different breeds to one another, but this may not always be case.

Sizing up the Situation

Regardless of how well the dogs in one given area get along, there are other factors that also need to be considered when accepting a dog sitting job. The first is the size and weight of all the dogs that you are expected to sit for.

Larger dogs that are weightier will be more difficult to handle and care for than if you are supervising a room full of poodles, whose average weight is about 5 to 9 pounds. The bigger canines will usually be more challenging unless they are aptly trained and this is especially the case when taking them out for walks.

running dogs

Each dog should have its own lease and take into consideration your own weight against that of the multiple dogs you are sitting for and walking. Even the best trained dogs can become startled or excitable and if they should decide to jet, if your weight isn’t enough to balance the weight of them trying for a fast getaway, you could easily lose control of one or all of them.

It is also important to acknowledge the size of the home in comparison to the number of dogs you will be sitting. Larger dogs should not be contained regularly in small spaces, while smaller, pint size dogs which don’t require as much roaming room or exercise may be perfectly content in an apartment.

Rambunctious dogs have the ability to hurt, even unknowingly, other smaller dogs as well as owners and dog sitters because of their sheer size and weight. If there are a mix of large and small dogs within one habitat they will need to be monitored closely and all should have enough space within the home to roam freely for at least part of the day.

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Dogs In England Must Be Microchipped from 2016

Wednesday, February 6th, 2013

It has been announced today that every Dog owner in England must have their pet microchipped from 2016 onwards. In a plan meant to reduce the amount of strays on the streets, the microchips will be encoded with owners details, and those who do not comply with the new law may find themselves slammed with a £500 fine.

The device, which is the size of a grain of rice is implanted into the Dog between the shoulder blades using a syringe, but is no more painful than an average vaccination. The device is made from ‘bio-compatible’ glass which is the same material used to make human pace makers. The device also fuses itself where it’s implanted, meaning it won’t move around the animals body.

lost dog

UK government figures show that in excess of 100,000 dogs are dumped on the streets each year, costing the public and welfare charities more than £57 million. This new law is hoped to drastically reduce these figures. The new legislation will come into affect from the 6th of April 2016.

Currently, charities in the UK such as Dogs Trust and Battersea Dogs and Cats Home provide free microchipping, although having the procedure performed privately only costs around £25. It is still unclear whether the government will pay for the procedure, once the law comes into affect. The Dogs Trust has welcomed the scheme, saying it would make a “huge difference.”

Statistics also show that around 40% of Dogs picked up by charities on the street contain chips with inaccurate data, meaning the animals cannot be returned to their owners. In the European Union, Greece, Italy, The Netherlands, Spain, Portugal, Hungary, Croatia, Germany, Austria and Belgium, already have compulsory microchipping laws.

 What do you think of this new law? Do you think it will help the situation? And if you’re from another country would you like something like this implemented? Get involved in the discussion in the comments below!

The Dog Walkers City Mega Membership is now available. Sign up today for a vast number of benefits ranging from premium members profiles to business guides and invoice templates. If you’re looking to be or you are a dog sitter, then this is the only membership you’ll ever need. Find out more here.

Pets on Tour – Bringing Your Furry Friend Along For the Ride

Sunday, December 2nd, 2012

Taking furry family members on holiday has become very popular in recent times, with many places accommodating to animal’s needs, it’s more appealing to take your pet with you than to leave them at home. Here’s a quick to do guide before venturing off on your holiday…

  • Location Considerations: Before you set off on your jolly’s you need to take into consideration your destination and how you are going to get there. Your destination should be pet friendly, so pick a location which is going to cater for your furry friend as well as having plenty of activities for both you and your pet, especially if you are taking your dog along.

 

  • Preliminary Health Checks: Make sure you visit the vet before you set off, a routine check is all that is needed, this just gives you piece of mind that everything is going to run smoothly on your holidays. Furthermore make sure your pet has an up to date microchip, this increases the safety of your companion if anything should happen, and additionally you should have a personalised collar made with a reachable contact number.

Pets on tour

  • Pet-Friendly Transport: Before you travel, it’s advised to get your pet used to the transport that you have chosen this will result in a smooth journey. When travelling by car, make sure you pack the car up before loading your pet. No matter what transportation you have chosen, the last 3 stages are crucial; make sure your pet has had plenty of exercise, enough food for a few hours of travel and that he/she has gone to the bathroom. After these preparations you are ready to go…

 

  • Panic Prevention: Revise the stresses that your beloved pet may encounter on your travels and try to avoid them. These stresses will vary depending on your pet, for dogs they feel most comfortable when with their owners as it gives them a sense of security. Cats however are very different; they are very territorial animals and feel most comfortable in familiar surroundings. Smaller animals have less stresses, and as long as they are comfortable and their habitat (i.e. enclosure or tank) is consistent, they rarely acknowledge a change in location.

 

  • Creature Comforts: Make sure you carry familiar toys and snacks with you, having items which carry the smell of home will comfort pets and will help them settle. When travelling you have the option to cage your pet or allow them to be loose. For small animals and cats it’s a must to keep them caged, this is for both yours and the animal’s safety.

Furthermore if the vehicle has to come to a sudden stop, then anything not secure whether it is a passenger or pet will become a moving risk. For dogs, it’s your choice if you want to secure them or if they are free to move around the backseat or your boot. They do demand more space than other animals and will be more comfortable when given the opportunity to move around.

 

  • Comfortable Conditions: Additionally you also have to consider the different conditions in your car. Windows should be left open when leaving a pet alone in the car. Cars standing in the sun can get very hot very fast and can cause serious problems for animals left inside. Windows should also be kept open when driving giving a continuous air flow; however be careful not to cause a draft.

 

Keeping temperature at a constant is advised.  Make sure you schedule regular stops to stretch out yours and your pet’s legs, allowing for toilet and food breaks too.

There’s nothing quite like sharing your favourite holiday experiences with your pet, so plan ahead and make your next holiday one to remember. It’s vitally important to consider their stress levels and health throughout the journey, and also to check on them at regular intervals to ensure they’re happy.

This article was written on behalf of Pet Health Info. Pet Health Info is a free online resource providing advice for pet owners regarding pet health care.

Photo Credit: Catskills Grrl

The Dog Walkers City Mega Membership is now available. Sign up today for a vast number of benefits ranging from premium members profiles to business guides and invoice templates. If you’re looking to be or you are a dog sitter, then this is the only membership you’ll ever need. Find out more here.

Dogs and their jobs

Sunday, November 11th, 2012

For most of us, a dog is a beloved family member, and a pampered pet.  We provide our canine companions with luxury dog beds, an abundance of squeaky toys, and the best pet food we can find.  However, not all dogs live pampered lives in return for performing the occasional trick to impress the next door neighbour.  Some dogs hold down full time jobs, using their strength, or their sense of smell, to earn their keep.

dogs and their jobs

Here’s a quick look at some of the jobs that a well-trained dog might do:

Therapy Dogs

Therapy dogs, or emotional support animals, are used to comfort people who are stressed, traumatized, or depressed.  They are used to help the elderly in nursing homes, calm young people testifying in courts, and offer support to survivors of natural disasters.  Some airlines allow emotional support animals to travel with their passengers, providing comfort for those who are scared of flying.

Military Dogs

Dogs have been used by the military for many, many years, and some of them have even been awarded medals for their bravery.  Today’s military dogs are highly trained, and are almost as well equipped as the humans they’re working with, being given bulletproof vests and high-tech cameras so that they can provide intelligence to their two-legged co-workers, whilst staying as safe as possible themselves.

Service Dogs

Most of us are familiar with guide dogs for the blind, but there are lots of other service animals.  People with epilepsy often have a service dog that will attempt to warn them of impending seizures, and fetch medication for their owner if a seizure occurs.  There are also hearing dogs for the deaf, and dogs that are trained to help patients in wheelchairs, and fetch items for them.

Racing Dogs

Dogs can be professional athletes too!  In Alaska, the Iditarod long-distance racing competition is a huge event, with entire villages turning out to watch the dogs (and the sled riders) pass through their village.  Teams have avid supporters, and the breeders consider training and caring for their dogs to be a full-time job.  Alaskan huskies are tough, strong, and have thick coats of fur, enabling them to survive in the difficult conditions of the Alaskan highlands.

Sniffer Dogs

Dogs have a far better sense of smell than humans do, and this makes them incredibly good at detecting illicit substances.  Police train dogs to sniff out a range of things, including drugs and explosives.  Dogs are also used in search and rescue missions, and customs officers use dogs to detect foreign produce that tourists might unwittingly (or dishonestly) try to bring into the country.

Medical Dogs

While this isn’t an official “job” yet, it could well be one in the future.  German researchers have ran some small scale trials to see if dogs could detect lung cancer by sniffing a patient’s breath.  The dogs had a 71% accuracy rate of detecting cancers, and a relatively low false positive rate too (just 7%).  More testing is needed, but it’s entirely possible that we may see dogs used in the diagnostic process in the future.
Guest post written and contributed by dog lover Amy Fowler, on behalf of House of Paws, specialists in luxury dog beds and other cat and dog accessories.

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Training Your Puppy without the Classes

Monday, October 29th, 2012

Choosing to get a puppy is a massive decision and one that shouldn’t be taken lightly. As well as all the costs and commitment, a puppy also requires a great deal of on-going training to ensure it grows up to be a healthy and happy dog.

Before you can train a puppy, you need to develop a mutual respect for one another. A dog won’t always do as you ask it to without a reward, whether this is a treat or plenty of attention and affection. Quite often, a puppy will seek a master in which it can follow and aim to please. This is usually the person who walks and feeds it, not necessarily smothers it with love and affection all the time. This relationship needs to be developed from an early stage to ensure your puppy looks to you for instruction.

Training Your Puppy without the Classes

House Training

So first things first, you will need to teach your puppy some basic house training rules to ensure it uses the toilet outside as oppose to inside on furniture and expensive flooring. Puppies, like babies do not know there is a right or wrong place to relieve themselves, so you need to teach them this. Under no conditions should you result to violence to correct your dog in any aspect of its training, as it can encourage vicious behaviour.

House training is usually achieved over a considerable amount of time, there is no short cut and there is bound to be slip ups from time to time as well. Encourage your dog to go outside at regular intervals, and when it does choose to urinate outside, reward it and give it affection. Take your puppy outside throughout the day, from the moment you wake up, before and after its meals and of course before bed time. This minimises the likelihood of accidents and also teaches your dog a positive routine.

Eliminating Biting

Puppies will usually bite and chew as it is a natural reaction to their teething process. Sometimes biting will be playful, other times out of boredom, and in some cases when your puppy is feeling a little tired and irritable. Again, avoiding using violence, encouraging good behaviour and discouraging bad behaviour will send the right message to your new four-legged friend that you and your belongings don’t appreciate being chewed or bitten, and that this will not earn it affection and rewards.

Another option is to encourage your pup to chew something else when you see it gnawing on your favourite piece of furniture. Supply it with a durable chew toy to keep it occupied, and in time your dog will learn that this is what should be chewed and played with, not the furniture.

Taking your puppy to training classes is of course not compulsory and by training your dog yourself; you will also save a great deal of money and build your very own bond with your dog. Training will be an on-going task throughout the dog’s life as its learning will never be complete and like humans, can occasionally make mistakes too.

Photo Credit: Adam E. Cole

This article was written by Sarah MacLeod on behalf of My Pet Stop, a UK based dog boarding company offing puppy training, dog grooming and much more.

 

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Why you should bake your own dog treats

Saturday, October 20th, 2012

We understand that you love your dog.  They don’t call dogs “Man’s best friend” for nothing!  They bring us joy, make us laugh, and comfort us when we’re feeling down.  They miss us when we’re gone, and get so excited when we’re back that you’d think we were gone for a year!  That’s why we are pet parents, not pet owners.  Our dogs are our children, and we love them as such.  So, why not feed them like we would feed our own children?  It’s easier than you might think, and a great way to get the kids involved!

There are a number of reasons to bake your own dog treats.  To start with, you are in control of exactly what is in your treats.  For anybody who has ever had a finicky dog, you know that there are some things they just don’t like.  This is especially true in the case of most treats you buy at the store; your pooch would much rather eat the burger out of your hand than chew on cheap, overly-processed treats that have an ingredient list a mile long.  So, why not compromise?  You can easily bake dog treats with peanut butter, pumpkin, cinnamon, or anything else you can think of, and those treats will be much better for your dog.

Why you should bake your own dog treats

Baking your own treats is healthier because you aren’t loading them with preservatives and importing them from some “kitchen” that may or may not care just how good those treats are.  Think of it like fast food; sure, you can get a burger through the drive through, but if you did that every day, your body wouldn’t be feeling quite as good as it would if you baked something healthy at home (and, honestly, who doesn’t love a good home-cooked meal?).

You also don’t have to worry about your dog having an allergic reaction, or developing allergies if you’re making the treats yourself.  Dogs can be just as sensitive as humans, so we should pay attention to what we give our pooch so they can live a long, happy, and healthy life.  Frequent allergies include beef, dairy, pork, soy, fish, eggs, and more.  Many popular dog treats contain these ingredients, too, limiting your choices if your pooch is allergic to any of these.

Now, you may argue that you’re not a whiz in the kitchen.  That’s perfectly understandable. Many people have grown up with a microwave oven being their primary food preparation device, so turning on the oven and baking something can seem like a foreign idea.  However, baking your own dog treats isn’t hard.  We’ve actually taken out a lot of the hard work and created something simple to bake.  If you’ve ever made a box brownie mix, you can bake your own dog treats.  That’s where Pupolicious comes in!

Pupolicious is a dog treat and icing mix, much like those boxed baking mixes you see in the store, that is quick, simple, and most important of all – healthy.  It comes with everything you need to start baking your own dog treats, and has 3 simple steps; mix, bake, and decorate.  The only things you need to make Pupolicious is a mixing bowl, rolling pin, baking sheet, a spoon, oil, water, and of course, an oven.  You can also easily flavor your treats, and http://www.pupolicious.com has flavoring suggestions and simple instructions for just that purpose.  It doesn’t stop there, however; Pupolicious is a great way to get the kids involved with the quick & easy icing mix (after all, what kid DOESN’T like decorating treats), so it’s something the whole family can do for your furry friend!

With Pupolicious’ safe, simple ingredients, you can easily bake dog treats at home, making it easier to show your dogs just how much you love them.  That’s why we call Pupolicious “the dog treat you bake with love.”

 

Author’s Notes:

Pupolicious is a new dog treat and icing mix available and made in the U.S.A.  You can read more and purchase Pupolicious at www.pupolicious.com

 

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How Types Of Grass Can Make A Difference In Housebreaking

Wednesday, October 3rd, 2012

When it comes to grass litter boxes, there are two very different options you can choose from. Some grass litter boxes utilize natural grass while others utilize a synthetic solution. Because grass litter boxes are used as a tool to help housebreak a new dog, there are certain characteristics which should be considered before you settle on your particular form of potty terrain.

Dog Training

Synthetics

There are many different brands and styles of synthetic grass. Some utilize fibers that resist scent and others appeal with a texture that matches the real thing. Regardless, of who makes them, there are certain characteristics which make them appealing to dog potty applications.

Synthetic grasses are renowned for their longevity. Unlike natural grass, they don’t have a lifespan, but that doesn’t mean they can’t wear out. Some producers such as the Pet Zoom produce a patch which can last up to three years with the proper care, while others like Pup-Grass take synthetic to a different level, applying every aspect possible, such as fast draining, tear-resistant, and even scent resistant. While each producer has their own synthetic grass format, companies like Pup-Grass strictly produce synthetic grass for dog applications, including the entire yard.

Unlike natural grass patches that can be thrown away or discarded, synthetic grass does still requireits own unique maintenance. Some manufacturers require hand-washing while others can be machine washed without excessive wear. The only issue here is that the material does get dirty and it’s not exactly disposable, requiring that you spend time washing and maintaining it.

This “immortal” aspect does have its downside though, because as you may understand, synthetic grass doesn’t have the natural scent that real grass has. This can make it difficult for a young puppy to accept or adapt to it if they’ve been accustomed to using an outdoor area. In these cases, you may be required to utilize incentive sprays, some of which may not work, leaving you shopping around for a product that works for your dog’s particular nose.

The real thing

Natural grass has certain characteristics which can’t be replicated by synthetics alone. The texture and feel of grass tends to have a natural instinctive appeal to a dog. But because it does have a lifespan, it isn’t always the most cost-effective method for your dog’s long-term potty needs.

Additionally, it also acts as a transitional tool for a dog that is in the housetraining process. If you are working towards motivating your dog to potty outdoors, this can be a very effective way to familiarize your dog with the particular characteristics of where it’s good to potty.

There are many differences between synthetic and natural grass, some which benefit certain applications. If you’re working on housetraining your dog, natural grass is often the simplest solution. Though it does help to find an indoor litter box that can provide either solution so that you can give your dog what they prefer without investing in a completely new unit.

Author Bio:

Brandon Kennington is the inventor and owner of the Porch Potty – the world’s first automatic grass dog litter box. As dog owner and a busy business owner, Brandon invented the Porch Potty when he didn’t want his dog to have to wait all day to go. Porch Potty admires dog owners and also provides great tips for dog lovers on the Porch Potty Blog.

The Dog Walkers City Mega Membership is now available. Sign up today for a vast number of benefits ranging from premium members profiles to business guides and invoice templates. If you’re looking to be or you are a dog sitter, then this is the only membership you’ll ever need. Find out more here.

How To Clean a Dog Leash: Home of the Germs & Flea Eggs

Wednesday, August 1st, 2012

Leash cleanliness (or lack thereof) is undoubtedly one of the most overlooked aspects of health and well-being for you and your pup.  Whether you live in the big bustling city of New York or a small fishing village in Japan, attention to proper leash care can lead to more sanitary living conditions for you and your dog.

How to Clean A Dog Leash

Consider this: How many of us wash our hands before a dog walk?  During any given dog walk , we clip the leash to the harness or collar, open the front door (and/or push an elevator button), pick up poop, perhaps switch no matter how temporarily, the hand that we are using to hold the leash, and also handle our house keys, which are all major sources of germ transfer.  That’s at least six different germ transfers per walk.  It’s not an understatement that it’s slightly gross and disgusting when you think about how many other unwashed, germ invested hands have also interacted with those high use items.

The question remains- how can you break the cycle of all of these germs getting onto the dog leash?  For some of you it may be months of germ and dirt buildup. For others of you years.  Germs, dirt and bacteria left to fester can lead to the slow erosion of the leash, be breeding grounds for flea eggs to hatch, and also to can also be an accessory to the spreading of colds and the flu. Multiply this by the number of people that use the leash (the dog walker, your children, spouse) and the number of people they interact with on a weekly basis.

If you follow a few precautionary steps, you will see how simple it is. First off, start by sanitizing your cloth leash in the dish washer (or for New Yorkers, in a tub of hot water and dish soap) at least once per week at a temperature of 150 degrees which can kill many bacteria and germs and flea eggs.

If you have a flexi-leash, you can wipe it down with Clorox and water.  To make life easier,  my personal recommendation would be to have three leashes in rotation, so you can get into the flow of regularly washing the harnesses and/or sanitizing the collars at least once per week and also regularly  wash your hands before and after each walk.  When you are at home, take off your dogs harness and collar to reduce the amount of dirt and germ transfer between the harness/collar and the dog.  As for your keys, the door handles and your front door handle- bleach and water.  For a green alternative, you can always use Dr. Bronners diluted with water.

Remember a clean, sanitary leash and getting into the routine of washing your hands before and after a dog walk is a small step towards creating a healthier, happier living conditions for you and your pets.

How often do you clean your leash? And do you have any advice? Let us know in the comments! Like this article? Please Share! 

Cynthia Okimoto is the owner of New York Dog Nanny www.newyorkdognanny.com and has been professionally caring for dogs since 2010.

The Dog Walkers City Mega Membership is now available. Sign up today for a vast number of benefits ranging from premium members profiles to business guides and invoice templates. If you’re looking to be or you are a dog sitter, then this is the only membership you’ll ever need. Find out more here.

How to Tell When Your Dog Needs a Walk

Wednesday, July 25th, 2012

Humans take words for granted. If any of us need to take a break at the office or at home we can simply say “I need to stretch my legs for a few minutes.” Unfortunately, dogs don’t have the same luxury. Here are a few tips to help you know when your dog needs to be walked:

 

  • Is it time for them to be walked? Dogs form habits very easily, so your dog will get excited around their usual walk time. Try not to walk your dog early if they’re acting up around walk time: your dog may start exaggerating their behavior regularly because you’ve rewarded them for being dramatic. If your dog seems uncomfortable or hyper after you’ve tried to phase out a walk time, you should bring the walk back. Dogs can become anxious if their schedules are altered.
  • If your dog makes a beeline straight to you when you get home, it means they’re feeling very emphatic about telling you something. It probably means your dog needs to go for a walk. Dogs are tense when the walk in direct, straight lines and relaxed when taking curving paths towards their goal.
  • If your dog has recently put on weight, extending the length of their walk or adding a walk to their schedule is a great way to help your dog lose weight.
dog needs a walk?
  • Has your dog been having accidents? Your dog may have Cushings disease, or another issue with their elimination system.
  • If your dog is displaying anxious posture and looking at you with whale eye (large, circular shaped eyes with their whites exposed) this means your dog is very tense. If your dog is standing near the door, or alternating their gaze between you and the door, your dog is most likely telling you they feel tense because they desperately want to go outside.
  • Conversely, your dog may try to show you they need to go out by getting very excited. If your dog trembles, keeps going into “play bow” posture, or becomes extremely rowdy, your dog is probably trying to tell you they need to get out of the house and burn off some energy.
  • Puppies often touch their noses, or touch their paws to their mothers when they need something. If your dog keeps putting his paw on your knee or keeps touching you with his nose, your dog is trying to tell you they need something. That thing they need? It may be a walk.

Those are some simple ways to tell if your dog needs your attention. Remember that your dog will be less anxious and behave well if they’re walked and getting enough exercise. However, never let your dog order you to take them on a walk with frantic or disruptive behavior. It’s equally important that your dog know that you’re the boss at all times.

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What Is A “Pit Bull” Anyway?

Wednesday, July 18th, 2012
There is no such thing as a “Pit Bull” breed. That’s right, no such thing. Four breeds have been street named “Pit Bulls” due to being the most popularly used in the unspeakably cruel underground “sport” of dog fighting; they are, the American Bull Terrier, the Staffordshire Terrier, the American Bull Dog and the Bull Terrier. All four of these breeds have been referred to as Pit Bulls.”Pit” originated from the fighting pits they were thrown into (yes, literally thrown into because the vulnerability they felt from the sudden disorientation made them more immediately defensive). “Bull” is a little more complex. Another cruel and inhumane sport, “Bull Baiting” consisted of unleashing several powerful dogs to bait (via taunting and distraction) and eventually bring down a tethered bull. Hence, when “Bull” is part of a dog’s breed name it was earned via being specifically bred for this (now banned) sport. The dogs were bred to be stocky, strong and extremely powerful. Although there are other breeds with “Bull” integrated into their names, they weren’t as popular in dog-versus-dog fighting as the American Bull Terrier, the Staffordshire Bull Terrier, the American Bull Dog and The Bull Terrier. The latter four seemed to have the most speed and agility for fighting one on one than the other powerful bull breeds such as the enormous Bull Mastiff and the super stocky English Bull Dog.pit bull

Somewhere along the passage of time, even though the breed was still being used heavily in dog fighting, the “Pit Bull” nickname for the Bull Terrier slowly peeled away in spite of the vicious public reputation it earned by being thrown into fighting pits by the real vicious culprits, humans. This was most likely related to the sudden popularity of the widely adored “Spuds McKenzy”, the Bull Terrier that Anheuser-Busch decided to elect their “Guru of Good Times” for Budweiser Beer.

Too bad the American Bull Terrier and the American Bull Dog didn’t fair as well, in fact, you can even find the American Bull Terrier listed as “American Pit Bull Terrier” in certain references. Once the most popular two breeds owned by American families in the 1930’s and 1940’s, and even though the infamous “Petey” from the Little Rascals series was played by, originally, an American Bull Terrier and also portrayed by additional American Bull Terriers and a few American Bull Dogs, the nickname “Pit Bull” still haunts both breeds. That’s probably because underground dog fighting unfortunately became popular again long after Petey’s frequency on television had faded into the past, and even though all four breeds were being used in full force again, only “Spuds” breached into limelight popularity and adoration enough to take his breed’s name off the “Pit” list. Did we ever thank you for that, Budweiser? Well, THANK you.

As for the Staffordshire Bull Terriers (also known as just Staffordshire Terriers) we have our beloved Cesar Millan to thank for getting the focus off the breed’s “Pit Bull” nickname, starting with “Daddy”, that lovable Staffy that charmed the American public (and the world) as he teamed with his pack leader, Cesar, to bring balance and harmony to aggressive, dominant and fearful behavior problem dogs all over the planet, from the tiniest toy breeds to the most gigantic power breeds. Since Daddy’s passing, Staffordshire Terrier “Junior” has now taken up Daddy’s torch as Cesar continues his work. GOD BLESS YOU, CESAR!

There are few things worse for destroying a reputation than being condemned by erroneous, bad press. Although the nicknamed “Pit Bull” breeds have been thrust by the media into the public stream spoken as if it’s a single breed, adding to the confusion, and being portrayed as the dog most prone to attacking and killing humans, it is not even on the top of the statistical list for such. In fact, the name “Pit Bull” is sloppily slapped on not just the four breeds that were used most in the fighting pits but on any breed someone decides to “allege” as being a Pit Bull or a Pit Bull mix. If someone even so much as speculates a dog that bit someone may have had some Pit Bull in it, it’s not even questioned and is reported as a “Pit Bull” to the Media and in all related Official Reports. I once went to consult with a client about an aggressively behaving dog they had referred to as a “Pit Mix”. Upon arriving I saw a dog that looked like a cross between a Beagle and a Sheltie, no kidding.

According to statistics, from 1982 to 2011, 68% of the dog bites resulting in fatalities were delivered by the larger more powerful breeds of dogs; that leaves 32% of dog attack fatalities being delivered by smaller dogs. Further, it’s reported that of all the infant and toddler deaths that have occurred from 1982 to 2011 due to dog bites, a remarkable 87% were inflicted by small to medium sized dogs. So we have to ask ourselves, WHY does the mainstream media keep this out of the mainstream? As the email circulating around states, “In the 70’s they blamed Dobermans, in the 80’s they blamed German Shepherds, in the 90’s they blamed Rottweilers, now they blame “Pit Bulls…when will they blame the humans?”.

Publicly condemning a specific breed of dog for being more prone to violence and lethal behavior towards humans is as ignorant as an alien condemning the entire human race due to Hitler or Saddam catching their eye. Dogs, no matter what breed, when suffering ailment or damage to the brain, when raised deliberately by humans to be aggressive, or when raised improperly by humans, can be lethally dangerous. It doesn’t matter what size the dog but, obviously, the larger and more powerful, the more potentially lethal it can be if it has uncontrolled behavior issues. Still, when it comes to “Pit Bull”, please remember, it’s not even an official “breed”. More importantly, it is the humans who own dangerously behaving dogs who allow the behavior to go un-rehabilitated and who do not make sure their dog cannot make potentially lethal contact with people and other animals that are the real culprits, manglers and killers.Like this article? Please Share!This post was written by Reputable Dog Behaviorist, Melanie Blair, Owner, Best Friends Canine Services, LLC, of Ohio, Dog Trainer & Canine Care Specia..

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