Posts Tagged ‘dog sitters’

Pets on Tour – Bringing Your Furry Friend Along For the Ride

Sunday, December 2nd, 2012

Taking furry family members on holiday has become very popular in recent times, with many places accommodating to animal’s needs, it’s more appealing to take your pet with you than to leave them at home. Here’s a quick to do guide before venturing off on your holiday…

  • Location Considerations: Before you set off on your jolly’s you need to take into consideration your destination and how you are going to get there. Your destination should be pet friendly, so pick a location which is going to cater for your furry friend as well as having plenty of activities for both you and your pet, especially if you are taking your dog along.

 

  • Preliminary Health Checks: Make sure you visit the vet before you set off, a routine check is all that is needed, this just gives you piece of mind that everything is going to run smoothly on your holidays. Furthermore make sure your pet has an up to date microchip, this increases the safety of your companion if anything should happen, and additionally you should have a personalised collar made with a reachable contact number.

Pets on tour

  • Pet-Friendly Transport: Before you travel, it’s advised to get your pet used to the transport that you have chosen this will result in a smooth journey. When travelling by car, make sure you pack the car up before loading your pet. No matter what transportation you have chosen, the last 3 stages are crucial; make sure your pet has had plenty of exercise, enough food for a few hours of travel and that he/she has gone to the bathroom. After these preparations you are ready to go…

 

  • Panic Prevention: Revise the stresses that your beloved pet may encounter on your travels and try to avoid them. These stresses will vary depending on your pet, for dogs they feel most comfortable when with their owners as it gives them a sense of security. Cats however are very different; they are very territorial animals and feel most comfortable in familiar surroundings. Smaller animals have less stresses, and as long as they are comfortable and their habitat (i.e. enclosure or tank) is consistent, they rarely acknowledge a change in location.

 

  • Creature Comforts: Make sure you carry familiar toys and snacks with you, having items which carry the smell of home will comfort pets and will help them settle. When travelling you have the option to cage your pet or allow them to be loose. For small animals and cats it’s a must to keep them caged, this is for both yours and the animal’s safety.

Furthermore if the vehicle has to come to a sudden stop, then anything not secure whether it is a passenger or pet will become a moving risk. For dogs, it’s your choice if you want to secure them or if they are free to move around the backseat or your boot. They do demand more space than other animals and will be more comfortable when given the opportunity to move around.

 

  • Comfortable Conditions: Additionally you also have to consider the different conditions in your car. Windows should be left open when leaving a pet alone in the car. Cars standing in the sun can get very hot very fast and can cause serious problems for animals left inside. Windows should also be kept open when driving giving a continuous air flow; however be careful not to cause a draft.

 

Keeping temperature at a constant is advised.  Make sure you schedule regular stops to stretch out yours and your pet’s legs, allowing for toilet and food breaks too.

There’s nothing quite like sharing your favourite holiday experiences with your pet, so plan ahead and make your next holiday one to remember. It’s vitally important to consider their stress levels and health throughout the journey, and also to check on them at regular intervals to ensure they’re happy.

This article was written on behalf of Pet Health Info. Pet Health Info is a free online resource providing advice for pet owners regarding pet health care.

Photo Credit: Catskills Grrl

The Dog Walkers City Mega Membership is now available. Sign up today for a vast number of benefits ranging from premium members profiles to business guides and invoice templates. If you’re looking to be or you are a dog sitter, then this is the only membership you’ll ever need. Find out more here.

Training Your Puppy without the Classes

Monday, October 29th, 2012

Choosing to get a puppy is a massive decision and one that shouldn’t be taken lightly. As well as all the costs and commitment, a puppy also requires a great deal of on-going training to ensure it grows up to be a healthy and happy dog.

Before you can train a puppy, you need to develop a mutual respect for one another. A dog won’t always do as you ask it to without a reward, whether this is a treat or plenty of attention and affection. Quite often, a puppy will seek a master in which it can follow and aim to please. This is usually the person who walks and feeds it, not necessarily smothers it with love and affection all the time. This relationship needs to be developed from an early stage to ensure your puppy looks to you for instruction.

Training Your Puppy without the Classes

House Training

So first things first, you will need to teach your puppy some basic house training rules to ensure it uses the toilet outside as oppose to inside on furniture and expensive flooring. Puppies, like babies do not know there is a right or wrong place to relieve themselves, so you need to teach them this. Under no conditions should you result to violence to correct your dog in any aspect of its training, as it can encourage vicious behaviour.

House training is usually achieved over a considerable amount of time, there is no short cut and there is bound to be slip ups from time to time as well. Encourage your dog to go outside at regular intervals, and when it does choose to urinate outside, reward it and give it affection. Take your puppy outside throughout the day, from the moment you wake up, before and after its meals and of course before bed time. This minimises the likelihood of accidents and also teaches your dog a positive routine.

Eliminating Biting

Puppies will usually bite and chew as it is a natural reaction to their teething process. Sometimes biting will be playful, other times out of boredom, and in some cases when your puppy is feeling a little tired and irritable. Again, avoiding using violence, encouraging good behaviour and discouraging bad behaviour will send the right message to your new four-legged friend that you and your belongings don’t appreciate being chewed or bitten, and that this will not earn it affection and rewards.

Another option is to encourage your pup to chew something else when you see it gnawing on your favourite piece of furniture. Supply it with a durable chew toy to keep it occupied, and in time your dog will learn that this is what should be chewed and played with, not the furniture.

Taking your puppy to training classes is of course not compulsory and by training your dog yourself; you will also save a great deal of money and build your very own bond with your dog. Training will be an on-going task throughout the dog’s life as its learning will never be complete and like humans, can occasionally make mistakes too.

Photo Credit: Adam E. Cole

This article was written by Sarah MacLeod on behalf of My Pet Stop, a UK based dog boarding company offing puppy training, dog grooming and much more.

 

Happy walking! Like this article? Please Share and let us know your thoughts in the comments!

The Dog Walkers City Mega Membership is now available. Sign up today for a vast number of benefits ranging from premium members profiles to business guides and invoice templates. If you’re looking to be or you are a dog sitter, then this is the only membership you’ll ever need. Find out more here.

Why you should bake your own dog treats

Saturday, October 20th, 2012

We understand that you love your dog.  They don’t call dogs “Man’s best friend” for nothing!  They bring us joy, make us laugh, and comfort us when we’re feeling down.  They miss us when we’re gone, and get so excited when we’re back that you’d think we were gone for a year!  That’s why we are pet parents, not pet owners.  Our dogs are our children, and we love them as such.  So, why not feed them like we would feed our own children?  It’s easier than you might think, and a great way to get the kids involved!

There are a number of reasons to bake your own dog treats.  To start with, you are in control of exactly what is in your treats.  For anybody who has ever had a finicky dog, you know that there are some things they just don’t like.  This is especially true in the case of most treats you buy at the store; your pooch would much rather eat the burger out of your hand than chew on cheap, overly-processed treats that have an ingredient list a mile long.  So, why not compromise?  You can easily bake dog treats with peanut butter, pumpkin, cinnamon, or anything else you can think of, and those treats will be much better for your dog.

Why you should bake your own dog treats

Baking your own treats is healthier because you aren’t loading them with preservatives and importing them from some “kitchen” that may or may not care just how good those treats are.  Think of it like fast food; sure, you can get a burger through the drive through, but if you did that every day, your body wouldn’t be feeling quite as good as it would if you baked something healthy at home (and, honestly, who doesn’t love a good home-cooked meal?).

You also don’t have to worry about your dog having an allergic reaction, or developing allergies if you’re making the treats yourself.  Dogs can be just as sensitive as humans, so we should pay attention to what we give our pooch so they can live a long, happy, and healthy life.  Frequent allergies include beef, dairy, pork, soy, fish, eggs, and more.  Many popular dog treats contain these ingredients, too, limiting your choices if your pooch is allergic to any of these.

Now, you may argue that you’re not a whiz in the kitchen.  That’s perfectly understandable. Many people have grown up with a microwave oven being their primary food preparation device, so turning on the oven and baking something can seem like a foreign idea.  However, baking your own dog treats isn’t hard.  We’ve actually taken out a lot of the hard work and created something simple to bake.  If you’ve ever made a box brownie mix, you can bake your own dog treats.  That’s where Pupolicious comes in!

Pupolicious is a dog treat and icing mix, much like those boxed baking mixes you see in the store, that is quick, simple, and most important of all – healthy.  It comes with everything you need to start baking your own dog treats, and has 3 simple steps; mix, bake, and decorate.  The only things you need to make Pupolicious is a mixing bowl, rolling pin, baking sheet, a spoon, oil, water, and of course, an oven.  You can also easily flavor your treats, and http://www.pupolicious.com has flavoring suggestions and simple instructions for just that purpose.  It doesn’t stop there, however; Pupolicious is a great way to get the kids involved with the quick & easy icing mix (after all, what kid DOESN’T like decorating treats), so it’s something the whole family can do for your furry friend!

With Pupolicious’ safe, simple ingredients, you can easily bake dog treats at home, making it easier to show your dogs just how much you love them.  That’s why we call Pupolicious “the dog treat you bake with love.”

 

Author’s Notes:

Pupolicious is a new dog treat and icing mix available and made in the U.S.A.  You can read more and purchase Pupolicious at www.pupolicious.com

 

Happy walking! Like this article? Please Share and let us know your thoughts in the comments!

The Dog Walkers City Mega Membership is now available. Sign up today for a vast number of benefits ranging from premium members profiles to business guides and invoice templates. If you’re looking to be or you are a dog sitter, then this is the only membership you’ll ever need. Find out more here.

Musings on Professionalism in Dog Walking

Wednesday, August 8th, 2012

In this era of austerity brought on by that pesky economic crisis, small businesses
everywhere are suffering the effects of tightened purse strings. As consumers pinch their
pennies, there is less money put towards those products and services which are deemed
to be inessential, and customers are being rightfully deliberate and conscientious about
those services they do engage. Unlike most specialist service providers trying to forge a
path in this variable climate, professional dog walkers are in the unique position of being
threatened by amateurs on their own turf. After all, with dog walking rates spanning
between £12 and £16 per walk, why wouldnʼt Mrs Wilson just toss a fiver to little Billy next
door in exchange for taking Monty to the park for an hour on Sunday afternoon so she can
have tea with the ladies? This is a question worth pondering for pet owners and dog
walkers alike!

In general terms, someone with the occasional commitment in their calendar that distracts
them from their dog walking duties isnʼt likely to need the services of a professional. We
“pros” provide a service which is geared toward those responsible pet owners who realize
their obligation to their petʼs health (and understand the significance of a daily long walk in
maintaining that health!) but who have demanding work schedules and daily commitments
that prohibit them from fulfilling that obligation. For such people, engaging the services of a
professional has numerous benefits: by spreading their responsibility, they can provide
their pooches with the vital exercise and stimulation they need – in a structured and
monitored fashion – while freeing up their schedules in order to meet their other
commitments. A professional dog walkerʼs clients are not simply trading a sum of money
for an hour-long stroll in the park, but are investing in the dogʼs health, their own personal
and professional time, and their peace of mind!

So what specifically can a client expect to gain from the services of a dog walker? It makes
sense to list some of the valued characteristics of professional dog walkers so that
potential clients can refer to them when investigating our services. And it canʼt hurt for us
“pros” to examine the benefits of the services we offer in order to improve on them.

Letʼs take a closer look at professionalism in dog walking by splitting the essential criteria
into distinct categories:

1. Knowledge and experience

• Familiarity with the characteristics and personalities of different breeds of dogs, and their
requirements for exercise, socialisation and mental stimulation (the latter being provided
through outdoor exploration, social interaction and games).

• Experience with leading a pack assertively. Dogs require a confident leader to follow and
this confidence in leadership only comes with practice!

• Knowledge of local neighbourhoods, the green spaces and dog-friendly areas. In other
words, dog walkers need to know a variety of places to go in order to provide their pack
with a safe, open space in which to exercise and play.

2. Organisation and preparation

• Professionals must be fully insured to cover any accidents that may happen on a walk,
and should be CRB checked to reassure the client whose home they have access to.

• Contracts are also a necessary requirement. This way the client understands the terms
and conditions of the dog walkerʼs services and fees. Even more importantly, the dog
owner officially gives written consent for the dog walker to access his property and for
the dog walker to take responsibility in case of an emergency.

• Pet information form – this is something I and other dog walkers I know enjoy using
during our initial consultation with a new client; itʼs essentially a questionnaire to gather
as much specific information about a pet as possible, from veterinary details to dietary
requirements, favourite toys and preferred hiding spots (in case we canʼt find Monty
when we come to pick him up!). Importantly, I also ask for the dogʼs medical history and
get written permission for walking off-lead.

• Dog diary – a daily diary used to facilitate communication between a walker and a client.
This can be a great asset to communicate everything from schedule changes to dog
behavioural issues.

3. Resources

I feel that many clients overlook this aspect of the dog walkerʼs cache; resources are very
important for the dog walk and involve regular expense to purchase and maintain (thus
contributing to the cost of the walk). The most important and expensive of the dog walkerʼs
resources is going to be the van!

• Dog-friendly van, to transport the pack from home to the nearest local green space.
Often these will have custom in-built kenneling for the comfort of the dogs, and air
conditioning for hot summer months.

• Toys, leads, poop bags (preferably biodegradable!) and healthy snacks to make the walk
go smoothly.

4. Responsibility and reliability

Dog walkers have an ingrained awareness that they are taking responsibility for the health,
well-being and happiness of their clientʼs beloved, four-legged family member. Not only
does the health of the dog come down to us, but in most cases the smooth functioning of
the clientʼs daily schedule does, too. To maintain both of these aspects, the most important
characteristic is consistency (which is why there are no “sickies” in the dog walking
business!)

• Never miss a day – good dog walkers always have a back-up plan for any contingency! If
a walker is unable to make a walk on a particular day, advance notice is required for the
client and a back-up walker should be arranged for them.

• Reliability in times of crisis – for example, pet illness or injury (and the knowledge,
experience and resources to be able to handle it).

• Flexibility – a very important characteristic, allowing the walker to be able to
accommodate the whims of a clientʼs busy schedule.

While there are doubtless further criteria to be considered (and if you have a suggestion, I
encourage you to leave a comment!), I hope the points raised above will provide a good
general overview of professional dog walking for potential new clients, while inspiring
those of us who walk dogs for a living.

In closing, Iʼd like to include one further important characteristic to bear in mind, which
applies to any successful business owner: the desire to improve! We dog walkers have a
duty of care towards our clientsʼ animals, and we should be striving to give the best service
and experience possible at all times.

Happy walking! Like this article? Please Share and let us know your thoughts in the comments!

The Dog Walkers City Mega Membership is now available. Sign up today for a vast number of benefits ranging from premium members profiles to business guides and invoice templates. If you’re looking to be or you are a dog sitter, then this is the only membership you’ll ever need. Find out more here.

Tim Adams runs Big City Dog Walkers operating in London, UK. Click here for a Dog Walker and Pet Sitter in Stoke Newington and Hackney.

Female Dogs In Heat

Tuesday, April 24th, 2012

dog walkers city mega

What is ‘heat’?
Firstly, ‘heat’  or Estrus (from the greek ‘sexual desire’) is a recurring period of sexual receptivity and fertility in many female mammals, in this case,  dogs. At what time a female dog or bitch goes into heat can vary greatly from dog to dog. The youngest is about six months of age though sometimes a female will come into season younger. First heat can start as late as 12 or even 14 months of age or later in rare cases. Generally speaking, dogs that aren’t spayed go into season or into heat approximately every 6 months. Again, it can vary from dog to dog, but this is a good estimation as to when you can expect your dog to begin this cycle.

This can be a real annoyance to pet owners and to all other pets in the household, for a number of reasons. The purpose of this blog post is to raise awareness and bring up some important factors that both Dog owners and Dog Walkers & Sitters should be aware of if not already. From our experience, it is a big topic of discussion amongst those who care for other peoples dogs – some people outright refuse to look after dogs in heat, for obvious reasons. Equally, it sometimes goes unnoticed, and owners may be furious to find there dog has been returned to them, albeit pregnant!

Either way, you can understand the risk associated with this, and although sometimes it can’t be helped, remember, it is the owners choice and responsibility as to whether their dog should have puppies. If you suspect a dog you intend to look after is in this stage, it is important to verify with the owner as to how they wish to deal with the situation.

How to Care For a Female Dog in Heat

Two Dogs

The heat cycle for a female dog lasts approximately 3 weeks. During that time her vulva will swell and she will have a bloody discharge. During this fertility period, your dog will be constantly releasing pheromones which is likely to attract male dogs in your neighbourhood. It is advised that you do not leave your dog outdoors on her own, when she is in heat. Male dogs are prone to becoming aggressive towards females in heat, and these behavioural changes need to be managed in order that there are no unwanted mishaps. One solution is to keep your dog inside, as this will help eliminate the fear of unwanted puppies or attacks by other dogs in the area.

However, keeping the female dog inside while she is in heat can also be inconvenient. The discharge can be not only messy but sometimes quite smelly. The best option is to keep your female indoors and confined to an area where the discharge won’t be a problem to clean up, like the bathroom, garage or kitchen – places where the floor is laminated and not carpeted. Baby gates are a cheap and convenient way to confine your dog without putting her behind a closed door.

If you put your dog in a cage while she is in heat, it is important to place it where she will be able to spend time with people familiar to her, as well as let her out for frequent exercise.  Being on heat should never be treated as a punishment, and you don’t want your dog to feel as though she is being unfairly treated or left out. Another common solution is to purchase the equivalent of a ‘nappy’ for dogs, which will contain any potential discharge, avoid mess, and act as a deterrent to curious males.

Your female dogs are also known to display aggressive behaviour, especially amongst other pets in the household, while in heat. This includes a pushy attitude, shouldering aside other pets and humping. As she will be highly hormonal, it is likely that you will encounter a great deal of assertive and dominating behaviour, especially towards other dogs. This should only be temporary, and will subside once she has finished the cycle. It is important to realise that this process is natural, animals interact and deal with each other in a number of ways to find their hierarchy within the ‘pack’, and you can either let them get on with it, or intervene if you feel as though it is necessary.

Other common symptoms of a dog in heat are general agitation, restlessness and often whimpering and panting, so it is important to give them as much love and attention as possible, to ease the nerves of going through this hormonal stage.

Remember, if she isn’t allowed to breed it can be very frustrating for  her and you! If you don’t plan to breed your dog, it is much better for her health and your sanity to have her spayed. Along side the prevention of unwanted puppies, getting your dog spayed can be beneficial for a number of other reasons. It can prevent uterine infections and other disease as well as ensuring consistent behaviour throughout the dog’s life.  You may have heard the myth ‘but I don’t want her to get fat’….this is nonsense, dogs get fat through poor diet and lack of exercise, not through getting spayed.

Making The Correct Decision

Remember, responsible dog owners will consider the options and make the correct decision based on what they feel is right. You could look at it in layman’s terms: do you want to breed your dog (for financial, genetic or any other purposes?), then you must deal with this responsibly. If you don’t think you want your dog to have puppies, then you may as well get it spayed, and eliminate any risk, rather than assuming that it will never happen…because as we all know, it can, and most likely will!

Getting your dog spayed is a pretty basic and routine procedure for modern day vets, even if it seems daunting for the owner! The process generally takes about half an hour, and afterwards, the incision os stitched up and will fully heal in a couple of weeks. It is advised to monitor her after the operation jus to ensure that the stitches are healing correctly, and she is eating and sleeping as normal. Also, it is wise to prevent any excessive jumping or bouncing around for a the first week, just to ensure the healing process isn’t hindered in any way.

For more information about the procedure itself and what it entails, we advise talking to your local vetinary practice to elevate any concerns and help you better your understanding.

This blog post is first in a two part discussion where we welcome any thoughts, comments and opinions our readers may have on the matter. Next time we will look into the pros and cons of neutering a male dog, and advice on how dog owners can deal with the scenario and make the best decision for them and their dog. Let us know what you think in the comments….

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The Dog Walkers City Mega Membership is now available. Sign up today for a vast number of benefits ranging from premium members profiles to business guides and invoice templates. If you’re looking to be or you are a dog sitter, then this is the only membership you’ll ever need. Find out more here.

Finding Dog Walkers – An Issue Of Trust?

Tuesday, March 13th, 2012

I’ve recently come across a few issues concerning the trust of dog walkers and sitters expressed in some of the dog forums I frequently visit. It’s an interesting issue and one that we talked about when Dog Walkers City first began development. In fact, we asked the members of these same forums whether they would use – and ‘trust’ – the internet when searching for someone to look after their beloved pet. The answer was resounding yes – with a few preconditions.

Those conditions included interviewing the dog walker before hiring them, seeing proof of insurance and joining in on a walk with the walker and some other dogs (including your own) for a first hand experience of how they work. In my opinion, all of these are a good idea – especially the latter – and caution should always be exercised when trusting a complete stranger with your dog.

The forum issues I’m talking about can be found here and although it is worrying that this sort of thing happens, it seems to be extremely rare considering the amount of Dog walkers there are around. Like any profession, sadly you will get people who don’t take their job and responsibilities seriously enough.

All that being said, I think once you’ve taken the above steps to ‘screen’ a potential Dog walker/sitter you will get a strong idea of whether they’re suitable or not. The main point is simply not to just let anyone look after your pet.

When we were first designing Dog Walkers City our first thoughts on the subject were to include a ratings system (which we have), in which people could rate their Dog walkers out of five. Admittedly, we have seen one major problem with this approach – anyone can rate. Which means that people seem to be down voting their competition and up voting themselves (although the system works so that from your computer you can only vote for each walker/sitter once).

Although we have racked our brains we can only come with one solution to this problem, which is this; in your members area you set up a unique password/code (separate to your members area password) that you give to your clients after they’ve used your service. Your clients can then come to Dog Walkers City and rate you but will need to enter your unique code to prove that they’ve used your service. This will stop anyone and everyone rating people unnecessarily.

This will hopefully solve the problem but we are slightly concerned that this is a long winded approach to something that people may not use.

We definitely need your input here on everything we have mentioned in this post, whether you’re a dog walker, a dog sitter or an existing or potential customer. Have you ever had any trust issues? Or how wary would you be when hiring someone to look after your pet? What do you think of the ratings system proposed above? Or do you have any other ideas that would help in this area? Get involved in the discussion using the comments below…

The Dog Walkers City Mega Membership is now available. Sign up today for a vast number of benefits ranging from premium members profiles to business guides and invoice templates. If you’re looking to be or you are a dog sitter, then this is the only membership you’ll ever need. Find out more here.